Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl


Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl The energy of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, one of the biggest crazes of the ’80s, has endured for 35 years. Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird’s initially dark comic creations — later given a kid-friendly refashioning — spearheaded Turtlemania: a toxic-waste fusion of martial arts and mutant teen reptiles that swept the globe. Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Donatello, their names cribbed from history’s most fabled Renaissance artists, characterised shirts, shorts, lunch boxes, and of course, video games. Konami’s 1989 arcade release, a four-player scrolling beat-em-up engineered to bankrupt unwitting parents, was a dream come true for kids tall enough to reach its bulky, shelf-like control panel. It was hardly the fairest of games, but its sound effects, introduction sequence, and “Cowa-Cowa-Cowabunga!” coin-drop jingle have since matured into giddy nostalgia. Despite Konami’s superior 1991 sequel, Turtles in Time, and variations on the theme on NES, SNES, Mega Drive, PlayStation 2, and Game Boy Advance, few have achieved the same kind of legacy — until now. Tribute Games, responsible for Scott Pilgrim and Panzer Paladin, amongst others, certainly hasn’t half-shelled it: TMNT: Shredder’s Revenge is the best Turtles scrolling beat-em-up ever. In places, there are such strong echoes of Konami’s titles that it flies dangerously close to potential copyright infringement. At the same time, Tribute and Dotemu has gone to town with the license, cramming the enormous sixteen-stage brawl with a broad compendium of bad guys — many lesser-knowns snatched from the depths of the Archie comic book series. UNFITGILR.COM SEXY GAMES

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl

Graphically, it’s a feast. There are no CRT filters for this pixel party, which some may find disappointing, but it’s so beautifully, exactingly drawn that it’s hard to muster a complaint. Every inch is crammed with detail, beginning inside April’s Channel 5 TV station before moving through New York’s backstreets and sewers. Familiar locations are rendered with fresh, loving attention to detail, gorgeous colour, and an authentic cartoon flavour, all strung together with great visual storytelling. The zoo features awesomely cute, bothersome monkeys and rampaging animals; the Turtles blimp trails you while you hoverboard above sunny city rooftops, dodging incoming missiles; and certain sections feel like you’re battling it out in the 1989 Playmates sewer toy set. It’s crammed with comedic elements, too. Idle Foot Soldiers steal the Turtle van’s wheel, rattle Game Boys, and lick ice lollies, all before you disturb their recreation with a nunchaku upside the head. The sprite designs are purposely squat, but adorable with it, superbly animated and bursting with character, and the Turtles boast plenty of individual personality. Splinter’s elasticky, ranged-but-powerful repertoire is presented exactly as it should be, and April O’Neil is simply superb, snapping photos of downed enemies and hammering through crowds with a boom mic. Fan-favourite Casey Jones, dealing out big damage with his golf clubs, makes the playable roster a whopping seven once unlocked.

Play with iconic TMNT characters and vehicles in diverse gameplay options

The stages have plenty of variety, although little is new. Bosses where you need to fling enemies into the foreground and obstacle-littered ‘Cheapskate’ skateboard rides are cherry-picked from past titles. Where it does work well, though, is the sheer number of enemies and how they attack, forcing you to continually apply different approaches. Bosses, too, are brilliantly designed and executed, with fun, engaging patterns and windows of opportunity to lay into them with a super. Equal effort has gone into the audio, with Tee Lopes of Sonic Mania fame mustering a sterling soundtrack. The Turtle’s vocal quips are recorded by the original cartoon cast, and occasional singing tracks that range from rap-style beats to cheesy rock appropriately cement the tone. The chords and motifs are kindred to the original show’s idiosyncratic sound, as are the one-liners spilled while you thwack Shredder’s Foot Clan. While the aesthetic is assured, it wouldn’t be worth much if the gameplay wasn’t up to scratch. Evidently, this is where Shredder’s Revenge comes into its own. The control scheme is a marvel of exactitude, squeezing everything necessary out of the pad while never becoming overly complex. You can charge-attack, dash, slide, double-jump, drop-kick, rising tackle, dodge, grab and slam in two different ways, and enact three types of devastating super attack, all in addition to your standard tap-combos. In tandem, this goes off like a dream. You quickly become accustomed to the move-set, which is cleverly adjusted for each character’s strengths and weaknesses, and then furiously mix it up. Only when you dash-slide into a Foot Soldier, launch into a rising tackle and drop-kick back down, followed by a dash-barge and additional juggles, do you realise how flawlessly taut the combat is. It may be combo and juggle heavy, but it’s all very easy to initiate. The result is a flamboyant, raucous Turtle-scrum, where you barrel fearlessly into enemy hordes, dodge-roll through explosives and out of clinches, and dominate the screen at ninja pace. Ultimate Fishing Simulator VR

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl

The formula works excellently for several key reasons. The dodge is a get-out-of-jail-free manoeuvre, its plentiful invincibility-frames making it integral to avoiding telegraphed weapon swings and projectiles, all the while closing distances with its optional snap-back attack. Additionally, extended combos and chipping near-dead soldiers before they hit the tarmac rapidly builds your super gauge, allowing you to launch into a dazzling proximity-based whirlwind of death that carves chunks out of boss health bars. If you take a hit at any point before the super gauge fills, it resets to zero (in any mode except Easy) requiring you to combo like mad, charge it in seconds, and then unleash its fury to buy a moment’s respite. This economy works brilliantly, but at the same time, presents the game’s biggest conundrum. For this review, we took April O’Neil on a single credit all the way to stage 13, loving the risk-reward combo-building and the pressure involved in avoiding hits. The adrenaline simmers when you get into later stages, forcing you to act sharp with dodges and leverage the generous iframes that come with rising attacks. But, on an additional playthrough, we discovered that the shoulder button instantly fills the super gauge with a comical animated ‘meditation’. This partly neuters the need for harder skill-based play, since you can find spots all over the place to quickly recharge — and once you know the option is there, it’s impossible to ignore.

Up to 6 players simultaneously

Still, while this does soften things up, it doesn’t diminish the quality of the experience. There’s an Arcade Mode on board, our preferred way to play, that’s as straightforward as it sounds. You gain an extra life for every 200 enemies dispatched, and it’s a nicely balanced, highly engaging playthrough on defaults. Kick the difficulty up to Hard — the go-to setting for beat ’em up aficionados — and the challenge is really on. Story Mode augments the game with a city map over-world, where stages can be revisited to complete challenges, uncover hidden items and reveal character cameos. The system here features a smart peripheral RPG element, whereby you convert accrued points into additional health, upgraded supers, enhanced ‘Radical Mode’ abilities, and even extra lives. The aim is to incrementally power up the entire team while working through the collectathon objectives. Multiplayer is fiendishly good fun, with up to six-players skirmishing it out with a range of cool team-up attacks and the ability to revive downed allies. And, although we weren’t able to test it online during the review period, you can party with internet-ready boys and girls at almost any point in the game. Void Bastards

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl

Tribute Games are aware of a catalogue of bugs and glitches, ready to be patched day-one. We did, however, encounter a few not on their pre-launch list. Audio pops occurred now and then, and certain sound effects, like windows breaking, didn’t seem to be working properly. There are occasional frame stutters even in one-player, but these are so fleeting that they don’t really affect the action. Once, during a two-player game, we were left waiting up to three minutes between stages on a black screen, and then, during a boss fight with Groundchuck and Dirtbag, the game slowed to a 1FPS crawl before one of the bosses went underground never to return, ending the game. The worst of our fates was making it to the penultimate stage, only for an error to occur, the game to quit, and no recourse to return to our point of progress. Despite these performance issues, we’re confident Tribute Games will smooth everything out, and it shouldn’t dissuade you from a purchase. Tellingly, these hiccups didn’t affect our overall opinion in the slightest.Two years in the making, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder’s Revenge is the best Turtles beat ’em up ever made, and a faster, better-looking, and more entertaining affair than even Streets of Rage 4. It looks delicious, sounds superb, and rekindles childhood memories beyond all expectation, time-warping you back to 1987. Its combat system is so much fun to mine that you feel compelled to keep coming back to try new strategies, and with its awesome multiplayer the experience evolves again and again. Like any beat ’em up, it does get repetitive as you enter the last third, but that’s more a fault of the concept than the game. Our only regret is that we didn’t use anywhere near enough puns in this review, so let’s close by saying Shredder’s Revenge is an unprecedented shell-ebration.

Old-school gameplay enhanced with super-fresh mechanics

Growing up as a child of the 90s, whenever I stepped into an arcade, I’d always do a walk around to see what they had before putting my quarters into any machines. This usually didn’t last very long because as soon as I saw a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cabinet, I’d shout to my friends “They got Turtles!” and we’d rush on over. It’s abundantly clear that the developers at Tribute Games share a similar love for the 90s TMNT beat-em-ups. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder’s Revenge is nothing but unwaveringly reverent to the classic 1989 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Arcade game, and more prominently, 1991’s Turtles in Time. Best of all, it transforms the arcadey quarter-munching design of combat into something much more skill forward while still maintaining the same button mashy appeal. Put simply, Shredder’s Revenge is a prime example of how to breathe new life into a classic arcade beat-em-up. Shredder’s Revenge is full of all sorts of winks and nods to the arcade games that inspired it, but it smartly doesn’t chain itself to them. Arcade beat-em-ups were originally designed to suck as many quarters as they could from the pockets of players, and thus have inherited a tendency to limit your ability to get out of the way of attacks or ramp up the difficulty without also ramping up your own power. Shredder’s Revenge changes all of that, as the turtles and friends can now freely dodge roll left and right; they can hold the attack button down to charge up attacks, which also has the added bonus of letting them take damage without flinching; they each have a Shoryuken-like rising attack that makes hitting aerial enemies a breeze; and most importantly, they each have a meter that allows them to use a screen clearing super attack when it’s full. Vader Immortal A Star Wars VR

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP Free Download Unfitgirl

Shredder’s Revenge is full of all sorts of winks and nods to the arcade games that inspired it. Aside from those additions, this is still very much the same type of game that fans of the old arcade cabinets know and love. It’s simple beat-em-up action at its finest – with a big focus on crowd clearing AOE attacks, power ups, and environmental interactables that can turn the tide of a fight in your favor. There are a total of 16 levels in Shredder’s Revenge, and many of them are arranged like a remixed “Greatest Hits” of previous games. You’ve got the streets and highways of TMNT: The Arcade Game, the sewers and subways of The Manhattan Project, and the prehistoric settings of Turtles in Time. But there are also a handful of levels that are wholly original, including one that takes place at a zoo and had me contending with regular stampedes, Foot ninjas, and aggravating little monkeys in cages that threw bananas at both me and my enemies. The levels are all charming in their own right, with plenty of easter eggs and gags throughout, though I do wish there was a little more variety in the mix. There are only two types of levels: traditional stages where you just move from left to right, beating up all the baddies in your way, and high speed hoverboard stages where you move from left to right, beating up all the baddies in your way, only faster and on a hoverboard. Tribute Games plays it safe with its level design, and the result is a very even experience, but also one that started to feel quite samey by the end.

Many of the levels are arranged like a remixed “Greatest Hits” of previous games Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder’s Revenge is fueled by the power of nostalgia and (presumably) dozens upon dozens of slices of New York pizza. 1992’s Turtles in Time is one of the most beloved Super Nintendo games of all time, arriving at a time when the Heroes in a Half-Shell were at the peak of their popularity. It’s clear that the beat-’em-up connoisseurs at developer Tribute Games have a deep reverence for both that game and the Turtles of the late ’80s and early ’90s, because Shredder’s Revenge is essentially a sequel 30 years in the making. It faithfully re-captures what made Turtles in Time such a cherished brawler, all while introducing a few new ideas to freshen up the classic 16-bit gameplay for a modern audience. If you’re a fan of Turtles in Time, you’ll feel right at home as soon as Shredder’s Revenge begins. The opening cutscene sees the anthropomorphic brothers gathered around an old CRT TV watching a news report that’s interrupted when a few of their notorious adversaries attack the Statue of Liberty. It’s not exactly the same as Turtles in Time’s opening, but it’s very close. Once you hop into the first level, this feeling of familiarity doesn’t wear off. The level introductions feature the same silhouette of the boss you’ll be facing, and if you’re playing as either Leonardo, Donatello, Raphael, or Michelangelo, you’ll notice that their abilities and combos have been faithfully adapted from their adventure in ’92. Chaining together attacks is more fluid than it once was, but you can still perform a plethora of recognizable moves, from barreling enemies over with a running shoulder charge to canceling a dodge in order to launch into a slide kick. You can even grab Foot soldiers and toss them right at the camera.

Add-ons (DLC):Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder’s Revenge Switch NSP

Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: 64-bit Windows 10 or MacOS 10.15: Catalina (Jazz)
Processor: Intel Core i7-4790 or AMD Ryzen 3 3600
Memory: 12 GB
Graphics Card: RTX 2080S/RTX 3070 or AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT
VRAM: 8 GB
Storage: SDD (1 GB)
INPUT: Nintendo Switch Joy con, Keyboard and Mouse, Xbox or PlayStation controllers
ONLINE REQUIREMENTS: Internet connection required for updates or multiplayer mode.

Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system

NOTE: THESE STEPS MAY VARY FROM GAME TO GAME AND DO NOT APPLY TO ALL GAMES

  1. Open the Start menu (Windows ‘flag’ button) in the bottom left corner of the screen.
  2. At the bottom of the Start menu, type Folder Options into the Search box, then press the Enter key.
  3. Click on the View tab at the top of the Folder Options window and check the option to Show hidden files and folders (in Windows 11, this option is called Show hidden files, folders, and drives).
  4. Click Apply then OK.
  5. Return to the Start menu and select Computer, then double click Local Disk (C:), and then open the Program Files folder. On some systems, this folder is called ‘Program Files(x86)’.
  6. In the Program Files folder, find and open the folder for your game.
  7. In the game’s folder, locate the executable (.exe) file for the game–this is a faded icon with the game’s title.
  8. Right-click on this file, select Properties, and then click the Compatibility tab at the top of the Properties window.
  9. Check the Run this program as an administrator box in the Privilege Level section. Click Apply then OK.
  10. Once complete, try opening the game again

NOTE: PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE LATEST VERSION OF YUZU EMULATOR FROM SOME GAMES YOU MAY NEED  RYUJINX EMULATOR

  1. First you will need YUZU Emulator. Download it from either UNFITGIRL, ROMSLAB or REPACKLAB. Open it in WinRar, 7ZIP idk and then move the contents in a folder and open the yuzu.exe.
  2. There click Emulation -> Configure -> System -> Profile Then press on Add and make a new profile, then close yuzu
    Inside of yuzu click File -> Open yuzu folder. This will open the yuzu configuration folder inside of explorer.
  3. Create a folder called “keys” and copy the key you got from here and paste it in the folder.
  4. For settings open yuzu up Emulation -> Configure -> Graphics, Select OpenGL and set it to Vulkan or OpenGL. (Vulkan seems to be a bit bad atm) Then go to Controls and press Single Player and set it to custom
  5. Then Press Configure and set Player 1 to Pro Controller if you have a controller/keyboard and to Joycons if Joycons. Press Configure and press the exact buttons on your controller After you’re done press Okay and continue to the next step.
  6. Download any ROM you want from UNFITGIRL, ROMSLAB or REPACKLAB. After you got your File (can be .xci or .nsp) create a folder somewhere on your PC and in that folder create another folder for your game.
  7. After that double-click into yuzu and select the folder you put your game folder in.
  8. Lastly double click on the game and enjoy it.

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