SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl

SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download

SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl


SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl Every now and then, a licensed anime title comes along that goes above and beyond your expectations. Not just an ode to the source material, but a finely crafted video game as well. That’s SD Gundam Battle Alliance in a nutshell — an almost dangerously addictive action RPG that franchise fans will likely adore. Despite its cutesy, chibi-style appearance, this is one of the best and most faithful Gundam adaptations that PlayStation has seen in a long, long time.Battle Alliance is a mashup of nearly every Gundam series going. It all takes place within a kind of virtual reality, where Gundam histories are recorded and stored. Playing as a faceless VR pilot, you end up trapped within the database, and together with Juno, your operations officer, and an especially chipper AI nicknamed Sakura, you’re tasked with repairing clusters of corrupt data to ensure your freedom. Naturally, this means taking to battlefields across loads of different timelines, and putting thousands of cute mobile suits to the sword. The story itself is largely forgettable and full of shaky sci-fi terms that don’t really mean anything, but it acts as a serviceable vehicle for ferrying you between missions. More than anything, it’s the gameplay loop that’ll keep you coming back — an excellent mix of bite-sized battles, tense boss fights, and the joys of collecting and upgrading an extensive catalogue of playable mobile suits. UNFITGILR.COM SEXY GAMES

SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl
SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl

If you’re a Gundam enthusiast, there’s a genuine thrill in seeing which suits and pilots pop up next. The aforementioned database corruption means that characters from far away realities can collide, leading to some especially cool crossover encounters. Once they’ve been sent back to their own world, you unlock ‘True’ missions where you get to re-enact the canon scenario, accurate character dialogue and all. The game even recreates key scenes from the various anime, further solidifying the feeling that this is a real labour of love from developer Artdink. Moving on, combat is straightforward on a surface level. Each suit has a one-button melee combo, a heavy attack, and three special moves, usually reliant of ranged weaponry that operates on a cooldown. A super attack is also an option once your gauge is maxed, and your defensive techniques consist of blocking and dodging. Again, straightforward stuff, but there’s a decent degree of depth to be found in perfectly timed blocks, dodges, and aerial combos. It’s all snappy, easy to understand, and fun to utilise. Taking on standard enemy suits is fairly simple, and perhaps a tad repetitive after you’ve invested tens of hours into the game, but cleaving an opponent in half with your trusty beam saber is always satisfying.

A Battle Alliance to Correct a False World

Boss battles, on the other hand, can be much more demanding. The vast majority of missions end with a big fight against a deadly opponent, decked out with a beefy health bar and uninterruptable attacks. These encounters are all about patience; waiting for the right moment to launch a counterattack. Think of it like Monster Hunter, but with funny little robots. These duels are particularly difficult if you’re alone, so you’ll be thankful for your AI companions. You can take two allies with you on missions, and although your buddies can be a bit stupid, bosses can only focus on one target at a time. As such, it feels like boss encounters are designed around team-based play, with mechanics like increased back damage being crucial in chipping away at the huge health pools. What’s more, you and your AI pals can revive each other, should things go pear-shaped. Some boss battles, specifically against giant mobile armour enemies, are especially well designed in that they encourage you to properly explore your suit’s capabilities. Perfect blocks and dodges can become a necessity when the going gets tough, and mastering a tricky fight feels like a reward in itself. Returnal PS5

SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl
SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl

So combat’s generally great fun and unlocking all kinds of mobile suits is a blast, but it should be stressed that there is a grind here. Individual missions only tend to last between five and ten minutes, but you’ll find yourself replaying them in order to both unlock and level up your shiny new suits. The excitement of finally getting your hands on a cool Gundam is often tempered by the realisation that yet more grinding will be required, if only to bring it up to speed with your current suit of choice. Co-op can certainly help alleviate any tedium, though. You can create your own online lobby or jump into an open one through the main menu, and any progress that you make carries back into your single-player campaign — including the unlocking of later missions. As you can imagine, co-op play reveals new strategies, and if you’re teaming up with a couple of pilots who know what they’re doing, it’s easily the most efficient way to get things done. But if you’re running into trouble and you don’t want to hop online, you can always make use of the game’s easy mode, which makes missions much less demanding. The only downside is that you won’t find as many parts — equippable stat-boosting items — during your excursions. In any case, a great place to start if you want to ease yourself into the experience.

Combo action with stunning visuals and dynamic animation

We’re making this same point again, but SD Gundam Battle Alliance really is a feast for franchise aficionados. Graphically, the game isn’t at all impressive, but the suits, in all of their chibi glory, have been perfectly modelled. Likewise, the property’s many trademark sound effects are here, and the soundtrack is stuffed with music from the shows alongside banging electronic remixes. For wannabe Newtypes, it’s nothing short of a joy. Gundam Battle Universe and the other Artdink Gundam games on the PSP are still considered to be some of the best entries in the franchise. The issue is, it’s been over a decade since the developer stopped making them. When I saw it was attached to SD Gundam Battle Alliance, this quickly became one of the games I was most hyped about this year. I imagined what Artdink, which made great mecha games with extremely weak hardware, must be capable of with modern tech. But after playing the game, I mostly just feel disappointed. This isn’t a bad game, per se. But it’s a far cry from what the dev achieved on much, much weaker hardware and it doesn’t offer the satisfying game feel I was hoping for. Resident Evil 5 Gold Edition

SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl
SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl

SD Gundam Battle Alliance has an awful lot of dialogue sequences. Too bad the story is just kind of there. Juno Astarte and a random commander are pulled from a simulation of the EFSF’s war against Zeon in the year 0079. An AI representing G:Universe, a repository for Gundam-related war data, has pulled them out of their simulation to help repair “breaks” in the simulations. These breaks cause the data of unrelated Mobile Suits and their pilots to manifest in the simulations of other histories. There’s, naturally, a deeper mystery behind all of this, but it’s never interesting. Truthfully, I read the story sequences as quickly as I could. They’re all fully voiced in Japanese, but the few characters are so banal and the narrative loop is so dull and repetitive that I couldn’t stand any of it at times. “Why are you still talking?!” I would ask the characters as they continued to prattle on (a sentiment some of you may share after reading my many complaints about this game). They’re all archetypes, from the bland AI Sakura Slash to the arrogant bespectacled Hermes Mercury who randomly shows up to annoy the other characters. I did find some amusement in the characters directly comparing the Kamille/Four scenario from Zeta with the lazily identical Shinn/Stella one from Seed Destiny. God, I hate Gundam Seed.

Tackle missions with friends in multiplayer!

There are three categories of Mobile Suit in the game: melee, ranged, and balanced. There aren’t a huge amount of Suits included, and many of them play similarly. The melee and balanced ones tend to have just a three-hit combo and a strong attack that you’ll need to chain to get a combo going. You can also use a launcher to knock enemies into the air. The combat usually feels identical between a lot of suits. Plus you can’t upgrade or change out any of your weapons or skills, so the gameplay for each Suit never changes. If you played any of the Gundam Breaker games and want more of that fast, satisfying, accurate action, you also won’t find it here at all. The combat here is much, much worse, featuring slow, clunky gameplay. This is compounded by the fact that, when you unlock new Mobile Suits in SD Gundam Battle Alliance, they start at level one. It’s true even if you unlocked them from a level 30 mission. This means you have to dump a massive amount of currency into them before you can use them in your most recent missions. I played as the Exia for nearly the entire game, as it was just too much of a pain to level a new Suit up to the level I needed. Not that the new Suits would play all that differently, mind you.

SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl
SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance Free Download Unfitgirl

Artdink’s other games don’t really have this problem. The Suits you unlock in those games are typically strong enough to take into battle immediately. You could also switch out weapons to keep things fresh. It’s a strange misstep. You also bring along two AI companions which you’ll need to have at the appropriate level. But they level at the same speed as your pilot level, meaning that you’ll also need to grind them up from scratch, so I stuck with Mikazuki and Tieria. You gain access to new pilot skills that you can equip every two levels. Almost all of these are either underwhelming or borderline useless. All of this would be considerably less of an issue if the combat was fine, but it’s mostly just mediocre. The combos and action can look suitably flashy, but the movement is clunky and doesn’t feel immediate. Pressing the standard attack buttons doesn’t see you attack right away. Instead, it moves your Suit into a boost and sends you careening toward whatever enemy you’re locked onto. Resident Evil 3 

This has the added effect of giving melee attacks stamina, which you’ll run out of if you attack too much. The lock-on is automatic, and made me feel like I was barely in control. It’s the absolute last thing you’d want in a game that’s almost exclusively action. What’s the deal? But that’s not the only issue I have with the lock-on. It’s strangely slow, as it’ll swing around a beat later than you’d probably expect. It’s also horribly inaccurate at times. I can’t tell you how often I went to attack an enemy, only to watch as my Mobile Suit went zooming past it, missing entirely. You have a super attack with a two-minute cooldown, and I’ve used it only for it to completely boost off in the opposite direction from the boss I was facing. It almost reminds me of the shoddy lock-on from 2001’s Journey to Jaburo game, which was the first 3D Gundam game we got in the West. I also felt like it was necessary to almost exclusively use melee attacks, which is weird for a Gundam game. All Mobile Suits have a gun, but it only has five or six shots before it has a lengthy reload. Ranged Suits can immediately refill your shots and skills, but it requires half of a skill bar. You won’t be able to make use of it regularly during boss fights. Ugh, the boss fights. The regular enemies that populate the levels are basically fodder. You walk up to them and hit them until they die. It reminds me of a Dynasty Warriors game.

Add-ons (DLC):SD GUNDAM Battle Alliance

Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 10
Processor: Intel Core i3-6300 or AMD Ryzen 3 1200
Memory: 8 GB RAM
Graphics: GeForce GTX 1060 or Radeon RX 480
DirectX: Version 11
Storage: 25 GB available space

Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 10
Processor: Intel Core i5-10600K
Memory: 16 GB RAM
Graphics: GeForce RTX 2080, 8 GB
DirectX: Version 11
Storage: 25 GB available space

NOTE: THESE STEPS MAY VARY FROM GAME TO GAME AND DO NOT APPLY TO ALL GAMES

  1. Open the Start menu (Windows ‘flag’ button) in the bottom left corner of the screen.
  2. At the bottom of the Start menu, type Folder Options into the Search box, then press the Enter key.
  3. Click on the View tab at the top of the Folder Options window and check the option to Show hidden files and folders (in Windows 11, this option is called Show hidden files, folders, and drives).
  4. Click Apply then OK.
  5. Return to the Start menu and select Computer, then double click Local Disk (C:), and then open the Program Files folder. On some systems, this folder is called ‘Program Files(x86)’.
  6. In the Program Files folder, find and open the folder for your game.
  7. In the game’s folder, locate the executable (.exe) file for the game–this is a faded icon with the game’s title.
  8. Right-click on this file, select Properties, and then click the Compatibility tab at the top of the Properties window.
  9. Check the Run this program as an administrator box in the Privilege Level section. Click Apply then OK.
  10. Once complete, try opening the game again

NOTE: PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE LATEST VERSION OF YUZU EMULATOR FROM SOME GAMES YOU MAY NEED  RYUJINX EMULATOR

  1. First you will need YUZU Emulator. Download it from either UNFITGIRL, ROMSLAB or REPACKLAB. Open it in WinRar, 7ZIP idk and then move the contents in a folder and open the yuzu.exe.
  2. There click Emulation -> Configure -> System -> Profile Then press on Add and make a new profile, then close yuzu
    Inside of yuzu click File -> Open yuzu folder. This will open the yuzu configuration folder inside of explorer.
  3. Create a folder called “keys” and copy the key you got from here and paste it in the folder.
  4. For settings open yuzu up Emulation -> Configure -> Graphics, Select OpenGL and set it to Vulkan or OpenGL. (Vulkan seems to be a bit bad atm) Then go to Controls and press Single Player and set it to custom
  5. Then Press Configure and set Player 1 to Pro Controller if you have a controller/keyboard and to Joycons if Joycons. Press Configure and press the exact buttons on your controller After you’re done press Okay and continue to the next step.
  6. Download any ROM you want from UNFITGIRL, ROMSLAB or REPACKLAB. After you got your File (can be .xci or .nsp) create a folder somewhere on your PC and in that folder create another folder for your game.
  7. After that double-click into yuzu and select the folder you put your game folder in.
  8. Lastly double click on the game and enjoy it.

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