First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl

First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download

First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl


First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl After spending hours upon hours playing (and loving) the likes of Eleven Table Tennis and Walkabout Mini Golf on my Meta Quest 2, I’m always intrigued to see how accurately other sports can be re-created in virtual reality. It’s no surprise then that First Person Tennis: The Real Tennis Simulator caught my eye, especially with the excitement of Wimbledon just around the corner. Does it manage to offer an authentic tennis experience that’s just as enjoyable as those other games I mentioned? I think so, even if it does have a few issues here and there. First Person Tennis looks to capture the sport in an authentic fashion, with players holding their racket (the Quest controller) and serving, hitting forehand shots, utilising the backhand, and trying to catch their opponents out by hitting from the baseline, landing drop shots, or lobbing from afar. All the rules apply here so you can’t hit the ball out of bounds, whilst you’ll also have to serve up accurate shots and keep on your toes to return any speedy balls that come your way. Of course, tennis is a very mobile game, so it’s easy to think it wouldn’t work perfectly in virtual reality. Luckily, First Person Tennis offers a few options to handle this. One of the obvious is simply running in real-time around the court, though this demands a LARGE play space – something a lot of players (myself included) won’t have. UNFITGILR.COM SEXY GAMES

First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl
First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl

Alternatively, players can automatically teleport to the ball to keep matches competitive and ensure they won’t be out of place to return a shot, whilst there’s also a more realistic auto-run option that’ll see your player automatically making their way to the ball. There’s even a running-on-the-spot option in place to try and make it feel like you’re actually working to get to the ball, but in honesty it just felt a little awkward for me. There’s are a decent selection of movement options in place so it’s easy to find something that works for you. Personally? I think auto-run is the most convenient, but it’s going to be a player-preference thing. The core mechanics are pretty good and ensure the game feels like… well… tennis. Whilst First Person Tennis isn’t always perfect with its physics or racket control, it felt accurate enough that I was able to control my shots and hit the ball how and where I wanted to. The most awkward aspect to figure out was the power, which is something that’s always going to be a bit of an issue when you’re not actually holding a racket or physically hitting the ball – it’s something you do get used to, but it never felt perfectly accurate. It doesn’t stop the game being fun, but it does mean it’ll take a bit of practice to get used to simply pulling off accurately placed shots. Interestingly, there are two ways to play: simulation and arcade.

Free Movement

Simulation offers a more realistic take on the sport, meaning you’ve got to be more accurate with your shots, how you connect with the ball, and where you hit it. Arcade on the other hand is more forgiving and gives players a bit of leeway to hit the ball how they please. Again, it’s a player preference sort of thing, but it’s cool to see that First Person Tennis has flexibility to offer both a casual and realistic playing experience. Players can work through a wide variety of tournaments in the game, with each spread across an array of environments and court types to reflect the real sport. Whilst none of these locales look especially impressive in-game (and don’t get me started on the clumsy character animations), the selection offered does at least bring a bit more variety to the experience. Still, the lack of a proper career mode was a little disappointing, especially since it could get a little repetitive just playing tournament matches over and over. Luckily, online play fleshes out the experience, with players able to see who is online and directly challenge them to a match in a similar style to Eleven Table Tennis. It’s a cool idea that ensures you’re always free to play someone, even when playing single player or practicing. HOWEVER, the notification that pops up to show a challenge is a little off-putting and definitely needs to be decreased in size – players don’t ALWAYS want to play online, so having a challenge pop up on the screen in the middle of a rally was a little jarring. Grandma’s House 

First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl
First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl

Still, the online play will definitely keep players coming back for more, whilst I haven’t struggled to find other players to challenge so far. Sure, there are times where it has been a bit quiet, but I’ve managed to play plenty of different opponents and have had some really enjoyable showdowns (especially in those tight matches that go right down to the wire). It isn’t quite as addictive as Eleven Table Tennis, but I could easily see myself coming back for more if the community stays active. Real tennis is a physical sport. Overhead serves, scrambling from baseline to net, lunging for balls just out of reach, with matches that can last for hours, tennis can be a rather grueling affair. Mikori Games have done an excellent job translating this to the virtual world with their simulator First Person Tennis! I reviewed Eleven Table Tennis earlier this year whilst Richard Bashara looked at Racket Fury. We enjoyed both these games, highlighting their natural fit for virtual reality as table play is perfectly suited for a small home user play space. Recreating a full sized tennis court in your living room, however, is a more ambitious challenge. Read on to see how these devs nailed it! Currently, an early access title, the game consists of a comprehensive single-player campaign, with multiplayer coming shortly. You play in a variety of tournaments including the Grand Slams, and all possible playing surfaces are here, grass, clay, indoor and more, all with realistic ball physics.

One handed serve

Initially ranked 50th in the world, your aim is to become world number one. You can customize your character, selecting face and body types, rackets, shirt colors etc. There’s no female selection as yet, which seems an omission but I expect that might come in time. There are two primary game modes, arcade, and simulation. Simulation mode realistically replicates the ball physics, which means for the uncoordinated like myself, it’s frustratingly hard. Arcade mode assists you in keeping the ball on the court allowing you to just thwack your shots at full pelt. I ended up sticking to this as it was a lot more fun, but for those wanting to really go deep into the game, the simulation mode will offer plenty of added depth. Movement Options The biggest challenge in trying to recreate a full-size tennis court is how to handle in-game movement. This isn’t an easy problem to overcome but the developer has gone the extra mile in providing every conceivable method of movement so you can choose what works for you. Let’s outline them here Much like Sprint Vector you swing your arms to move. Having to use those same arms to also hit the ball I found this unplayable but it will certainly increase your fitness output! Here you push the thumb-pad on the left touch controller to move. This will cause nausea for some people but the iron-stomached will appreciate it. Grand Theft Auto IV GTA 

First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl
First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl

Automatic Movement – The camera moves automatically. Might still cause nausea for some but less complicated than manual movement as the computer automatically handles positioning for you so you can just concentrate on hitting the ball. Teleport – Here you are simply teleported to the area of the court where the ball is headed. You can also press in either thumb-stick to teleport to and from the net. I actually found this mode perfect for me. No nausea, no worrying about positioning, and it resulted in a really playable experience. First Person Tennis is the best virtual tennis game on the market, and its not even close. The versatility and graphics of this game are second to none inside of the virtual industry, and the locomotion options inside of this game are all great in their own way. The only knock on this game is that I wish it was less like real life, so maybe I could win a few games. Tennis isn’t an easy sport, and First Person Tennis reflects that. Tennis is a physically demanding sport. Running from the baseline to the net, scrambling from side to side, and even lunging for balls at times throughout your match. No matter how you look at it, tennis isn’t for anyone. If you think you have what it takes to be a star tennis player, download this game and test it out. You will be surprised with how real this game is and how challenging it can be at times.

Arm Swinging

When you first load into this game, you see handful of flags for you to choose from for the language your gameplay will be in. Choose your language and from there you will be presented with a crisp menu with a few selections. In the middle you will see a option to “continue”, if you click this you will be able to design your player down to the sweatbands, a fun customizable feature that most VR games don’t feature. Do note that there is no selection for girls yet, but that is sure to change in the near future. From here you will be at a menu in which you pick your tournament to play in. Be careful, as where you pick will determine what kind of court you and your avatar are playing on. The cement courts behave like any court would, but the clay and grass courts are a little different. The clay court tends to stick a little more, making the ball not as bouncy and will stay on the ground much more than any other court would tend to. The grass courts will make the ball go much fast and slip off the ground much easier than any other will. This will make it harder for your player to move about and the speed of the ball is certain to trip you up at times. Be very mindful of this when you are selecting your tournaments to play in. In the training section of the game you are going to have a number of hits to practice. Spending some time in this part of the game before you get against any real opponents is sure to help your virtual and real game. Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas

First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl
First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR Free Download Unfitgirl

Every hit you can think of in real tennis to practice, you can practice those inside of virtual reality. You are initially ranked number 50 in the entire world, and if you are serious about ranking number 1 you are going to have some real work to get done for a prestigious ranking like that, even though it may be inside a video game. Overall this game is something I am going to be coming back to. Its a fun way to play tennis and it is sure to give you a challenge whenever you strap your headset on. The physics are everything you would hope for in a sport game like this, and the movement feels natural and real all throughout your gaming experience. When a VR sports game nails the physics and emulates that real world activity accurately, it can be an absolute dream to put on a headset and play against others in some physical competition. I’ve boxed, golfed, snow boarded and played ping pong all in VR with some of the games I’ve played nailing their respective genre while others have left me wanting. As far as VR goes, I have only played one other Tennis game in Dream Match Tennis for the PSVR, which I enjoyed. First Person Tennis (terrible name) has been around for awhile now and with it’s official Quest release happening soon, it’s time to see just how close to the real sport it is.. There are a few game options to choose from, including some practice modes as well as various locomotion selections from teleportation

While each of the options works more or less like they should, I feel like the bulk of the players will use either teleportation or automatic run as they are the easiest and most fun ways to play. The other play styles offer up unique ways to play but running on the spot to move just felt weird and using the thumbsticks to run around the court was very challenging and I very rarely got myself in the right position to smack the ball. The 3 game modes offered up are Tour, which takes you through a series of tournaments against various opponents around the world, practice which lets you choose specific swing types you would like to work on & multiplayer which pits you against another human. In any mode you can play with arcade or simulation physics with the difference between them being subtle but noticeable.as the sim physics make the game a little more challenging while arcade offers up more of an aim-assist option that seems to adjust the impact of my swings just enough to keep the ball in play while still making me feel like I was making those shots which was awesome! You can have 3 tournaments going simultaneously with whatever options you want or if you were looking for some online competition, the main menu shows how many players are online so you can join or send an invite for some intense P v P action.

Add-ons (DLC):First Person Tennis – The Real Tennis Simulator VR

Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 10/8/7/Vista/XP
Processor: 2.66 GHz Intel Core 2 Quad Q8400, 3.0 GHz AMD Phenom II X4 940
Memory: 4 GB RAM
Graphics: NVIDIA GTX 1060 / RADEON RX 580
DirectX: Version 9.0c
Storage: 3 GB available space

Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 10/8/7/Vista/XP
Processor: 3.5 GHz Intel Core i7 3700, 4.0 GHz AMD FX-8350
Memory: 8 GB RAM
Graphics: NVIDIA GTX 1080 / RADEON RX VEGA 64
DirectX: Version 9.0c
Storage: 3 GB available space

NOTE: THESE STEPS MAY VARY FROM GAME TO GAME AND DO NOT APPLY TO ALL GAMES

  1. Open the Start menu (Windows ‘flag’ button) in the bottom left corner of the screen.
  2. At the bottom of the Start menu, type Folder Options into the Search box, then press the Enter key.
  3. Click on the View tab at the top of the Folder Options window and check the option to Show hidden files and folders (in Windows 11, this option is called Show hidden files, folders, and drives).
  4. Click Apply then OK.
  5. Return to the Start menu and select Computer, then double click Local Disk (C:), and then open the Program Files folder. On some systems, this folder is called ‘Program Files(x86)’.
  6. In the Program Files folder, find and open the folder for your game.
  7. In the game’s folder, locate the executable (.exe) file for the game–this is a faded icon with the game’s title.
  8. Right-click on this file, select Properties, and then click the Compatibility tab at the top of the Properties window.
  9. Check the Run this program as an administrator box in the Privilege Level section. Click Apply then OK.
  10. Once complete, try opening the game again

NOTE: PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE LATEST VERSION OF YUZU EMULATOR FROM SOME GAMES YOU MAY NEED  RYUJINX EMULATOR

  1. First you will need YUZU Emulator. Download it from either UNFITGIRL, ROMSLAB or REPACKLAB. Open it in WinRar, 7ZIP idk and then move the contents in a folder and open the yuzu.exe.
  2. There click Emulation -> Configure -> System -> Profile Then press on Add and make a new profile, then close yuzu
    Inside of yuzu click File -> Open yuzu folder. This will open the yuzu configuration folder inside of explorer.
  3. Create a folder called “keys” and copy the key you got from here and paste it in the folder.
  4. For settings open yuzu up Emulation -> Configure -> Graphics, Select OpenGL and set it to Vulkan or OpenGL. (Vulkan seems to be a bit bad atm) Then go to Controls and press Single Player and set it to custom
  5. Then Press Configure and set Player 1 to Pro Controller if you have a controller/keyboard and to Joycons if Joycons. Press Configure and press the exact buttons on your controller After you’re done press Okay and continue to the next step.
  6. Download any ROM you want from UNFITGIRL, ROMSLAB or REPACKLAB. After you got your File (can be .xci or .nsp) create a folder somewhere on your PC and in that folder create another folder for your game.
  7. After that double-click into yuzu and select the folder you put your game folder in.
  8. Lastly double click on the game and enjoy it.

(Visited 33 times, 1 visits today)

You May Also Like